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New Coach Call-out!

We are looking for another self-employed strength coach!

About us

We are the inclusive, body-positive gym that’s run by its members.

We offer expertly-delivered strength training and HIIT sessions in a supportive, open environment where people can feel comfortable to train and progress free from judgements about who they are and what they can lift.

We are a co-operative, meaning decisions about the running of the gym are made collectively by our coaches and members. We seem to be the only gym that runs like this in the country, and we’re excited to demonstrate how this alternative gym model can work.

You read more about the reasons we set up in our Aims & Objectives.

About the job

We are looking for someone to join our coaching team who will:

  • Revel in our members’ successes and support them through their challenges.
  • Lead by example to create an environment of excitement and respect in every class.
  • Give new members a warm welcome and introduce them to the class when they arrive
  • Make sure all members are signed-in before midnight
  • Plan and deliver safe, effective, fun workouts, with appropriate modifications to accommodate injuries and abilities
  • Be present for members’ questions before and after classes
  • Actively listen and reflect on how future sessions can be made even better
  • Have a nationally-accredited trainer certification, insurance and Emergency First Aid
  • Become a member of our co-operative and help us shape our alternative gym future

You will be required to lead classes on some weekday lunchtimes and evenings. Currently, our timetable includes classes on:

  • Monday 13:00-14:00, 17:30-19:00
  • Wednesday 13:00-14:00, 17:30-19:00, 19:00-20:00
  • Thursday 17:30-18:30, 18:30-20:00

Ideally, you would be able to cover all of these in the period between 17th and 23rd September, while our other coach is on holiday.

Usually, the classes would be split between both coaches. The times may change in future, and classes may be added or removed, but this would be decided co-operatively to suit you, the other coach, and our members.

In exchange, you would be paid £20-30 / hour and have access to All Hallows Hall and the gym’s equipment to run Personal Training sessions on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays 06:00-12:00 for £12.50 / hour (or less, if you’re training at the same time as another coach and can split the rent).

We want to demonstrate that an alternative gym model is possible. If you would like to be a part of this, please write to us at mail[at]bristolcooperativegym.org before 17th August, explaining why you’ll be a great fit.

We are particularly interested to hear from people who are under-represented in the fitness industry.

Thank you!

Floating: My Experience Of Sensory Deprivation Therapy

Doing nothing really does something
Doing nothing really does something

At the bottom of Park Street is the back shop, Back In Action. You may have passed it on your walk up to the museum, perhaps trying to figure out how to sit on the unusual furniture in the window. I am here to use their Flotation Centre. Read more…

If You Can’t Sit Less, Sit Differently

In the UK, adults of working age sit down for an average of 9.5 hours each day. As we get older, this increases (source). We’ve all heard how sitting down is terribly bad for us, but what can we really do about that? Most of us are employed in ways that involve being sedentary and wouldn’t be willing or able to quit our jobs just so we can sit less. Read more…

If You Have To, Which Protein Bar?

"Wake up, Homer! Those bars are just junk! They're made out of apple cores and Chinese newspapers!"
“Wake up, Homer! Those bars are just junk! They’re made out of apple cores and Chinese newspapers!”

Recently I have been experimenting with what I eat. As is my way, I have really gone to town on it and have been tracking my calories, protein, fat, carbs etc.. I’ve been enjoying the way that feels and what it’s taught me about food and my body but I want to say right at the start of this post that tracking and getting weird about food like this is absolutely not necessary.

To pay my bills and fund my impulse purchases (most recently, this), I do support work at a university. I only work term-time and this week is my first week back. This is the first year where I have been paying this much attention to what I eat, so before going back I wanted to get a plan together for how I was going to continue to meet my calorie, protein, fat etc. targets while not spending loads of money and with minimal faff. Read more…

From a Mile to an Ultramarathon on Bristol Footpaths

A lush old track in Dyrham

After I wrote the post about running, a few people said they like the idea of using routes that are less urban, so I thought I’d share this spreadsheet that I made. Read more…

Lessons Learned About Training From My Time in Skyrim

Lovely except for the mud crabs

I can tell that I’m overdoing it and getting my “work / life balance” wrong when I start to crave escapism. I usually end up looking at really isolated Photo Spheres on Google Earth, checking the release date for The Book of Dust (again), and playing Playstation. Read more…

In Praise of Not Specialising (and Lara Croft)

Warming up for a Strength Circuit

Specificity

One of the first things you are taught as a coach is the principle of specificity. This is usually summed up as “Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demand” (the SAID principle), meaning that the body adapts to the specific demands placed upon it.

The researcher Chris Beardsley published a nice series of articles recently about this that are worth reading, if you find this interesting. In one of them, he lists how strength can be specific to:

  • the type of load being used
  • the direction the force is being applied against the load
  • how quickly the force is being applied
  • how many reps are being done
  • the range of motion used
  • the muscle group being tested
  • the type of contraction the muscle is doing (concentric or eccentric)
  • the stability of the surface being tested on

This is because of adaptations to bones, connective tissue and musculature as well as to the way the brain interacts with the muscles. You might hear this all summarised in the phrase “strength is a skill”. In order to get better at doing something, you’ve got to practice it. Read more…

Forest Bathing in the City

Leigh Woods isn't a forest but it's still pretty nice

This Spring there was a flurry of articles getting excited about shinrin-yoku, the Japanese practice of “forest bathing” – relaxing in woodland.

The concept of forest bathing and other nature therapies is that we enter the environment in a stressed state (due to urban life and technology), experience the restorative effects of nature, and that this has some sort of preventive medical effect. Read more…

Making Running Alright

This spring I got bored of training. When I first started going to the gym, I’d decided on some particular bodyweight-related amounts that I wanted to be able to deadlift, squat and bench press. Reaching those milestones felt fantastic and I’d assumed that I’d then just try to maintain that level of strength for the rest of my life and that would be that. The problem is that even maintenance of strength takes quite a bit of time, and I noticed myself feeling less interested in doing this because it all felt a bit vague and incomprehensible. I had a sort of existential crisis of, “oh, well this is it now FOREVER”. I know that resistance training is good for me and worth making a life-long habit of but I wasn’t finding it very exciting anymore. Read more…

Movement Forum 2: Glutes

Glutes

What we were stretching and why

The gluteals are a collection of synergistic muscles that are mainly concerned with external rotation, (turning your feet out) extension (bringing your straight leg back) and adduction (bringing your leg out to the side). This collection of muscles are large, with the gluteus maximus being the largest muscle in the body, and are capable of producing incredible amounts of force, if working correctly.

Read more…